2022 January 24

Day       rain 70%.    53⁰     Isolated thunderstorms early this morning. Cloudy with showers likely. Near steady temperature in the lower 50s. Southwest winds around 5 mph. Chance of rain 70 percent.
Night     44°     Partly cloudy. Areas of fog after midnight. Lows around 40. South winds around 5 mph becoming west after midnight.

Arik came over today bearing food from an Indian restaurant.  He asked what we were doing with Rudolf the red nose pickup. I told him that the plan was to turn it in for salvage. The hold up being the lack of a title. He offered to take me to get a new title. I went online and made an appointment for 2:45. We arrived a few minutes before the appointment and tried to get checked in, but it wasn’t working. That’s when I realized that I’d set the appointment for tomorrow. They were allowing walk-ins, so I took a number. We waited in line for a bit before Arik said, “Let’s go wait in the truck. I’ve already had COVID and I’ll bet at least one person in there has it now.” He set the alarm for 20 minutes. When the alarm sounded, he went in to check prices of the line. He came out and reset the alarm. This was repeated several times. Finally we went back inside and waited a short time before my number was called. When I got to speak to someone, she said that the truck isn’t registered in Texas and is have to contact Iowa for a duplicate title.

Once we left the DOMV, we stopped at the Georgetown Department of Public Housing to drop off paperwork. They required a copy of my driver’s license and social security card. They didn’t have a copy machine. Arik drive to Office Depot and made copies of the documents. He also printed a copy of the Iowa form needed to request a duplicate title.

Once we were home, I filled out the request and got it ready to mail.

I know that it sounds like pretty much a wasted day. But it wasn’t really because I got to spend a lot of alone time with my son. We spoke “of many things, of cabbages and kings.”* The funny thing is, we really did speak of cabbages and kings. I told Arik about the pork stew I’d made and how I am going to dice a cabbage heart to add to the stew when I reheat the leftovers. I also related how I had added “jam” to a sermon about David and Goliath. I part of that telling, I told about King Saul being head and shoulders taller that any other Israelite.**

*The Walrus and the Carpenter 
Launch Audio in a New Window
BY LEWIS CARROLL
“The sun was shining on the sea,

      Shining with all his might:

He did his very best to make

      The billows smooth and bright —

And this was odd, because it was

      The middle of the night.



The moon was shining sulkily,

      Because she thought the sun

Had got no business to be there

      After the day was done —

“It’s very rude of him,” she said,

      “To come and spoil the fun.”



The sea was wet as wet could be,

      The sands were dry as dry.

You could not see a cloud, because

      No cloud was in the sky:

No birds were flying overhead —

      There were no birds to fly.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Were walking close at hand;

They wept like anything to see

      Such quantities of sand:

If this were only cleared away,’

      They said, it would be grand!’



If seven maids with seven mops

      Swept it for half a year,

Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,

      That they could get it clear?’

I doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,

      And shed a bitter tear.



O Oysters, come and walk with us!’

      The Walrus did beseech.

A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,

      Along the briny beach:

We cannot do with more than four,

      To give a hand to each.’



The eldest Oyster looked at him,

      But never a word he said:

The eldest Oyster winked his eye,

      And shook his heavy head —

Meaning to say he did not choose

      To leave the oyster-bed.



But four young Oysters hurried up,

      All eager for the treat:

Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,

      Their shoes were clean and neat —

And this was odd, because, you know,

      They hadn’t any feet.



Four other Oysters followed them,

      And yet another four;

And thick and fast they came at last,

      And more, and more, and more —

All hopping through the frothy waves,

      And scrambling to the shore.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Walked on a mile or so,

And then they rested on a rock

      Conveniently low:

And all the little Oysters stood

      And waited in a row.



The time has come,’ the Walrus said,

      To talk of many things:

Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —

      Of cabbages — and kings —

And why the sea is boiling hot —

      And whether pigs have wings.’



But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,

      Before we have our chat;

For some of us are out of breath,

      And all of us are fat!’

No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.

      They thanked him much for that.



A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,

      Is what we chiefly need:

Pepper and vinegar besides

      Are very good indeed —

Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,

      We can begin to feed.’



But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,

      Turning a little blue.

After such kindness, that would be

      A dismal thing to do!’

The night is fine,’ the Walrus said.

      Do you admire the view?



It was so kind of you to come!

      And you are very nice!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      Cut us another slice:

I wish you were not quite so deaf —

      I’ve had to ask you twice!’



It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,

      To play them such a trick,

After we’ve brought them out so far,

      And made them trot so quick!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      The butter’s spread too thick!’



I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:

      I deeply sympathize.’

With sobs and tears he sorted out

      Those of the largest size,

Holding his pocket-handkerchief

      Before his streaming eyes.



O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,

      You’ve had a pleasant run!

Shall we be trotting home again?’

      But answer came there none —

And this was scarcely odd, because

      They’d eaten every one.”



First Samuel 9:2 says “from the shoulders up” Saul was taller than other Israelites,First Samuel 9:2 says “from the shoulders up” Saul was taller than other Israelites,

And this was odd, because it was





The moon was shining sulkily,

      Because she thought the sun

Had got no business to be there

      After the day was done —

“It’s very rude of him,” she said,

      “To come and spoil the fun.”



The sea was wet as wet could be,

      The sands were dry as dry.

You could not see a cloud, because

      No cloud was in the sky:

No birds were flying overhead —

      There were no birds to fly.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Were walking close at hand;

They wept like anything to see

      Such quantities of sand:

If this were only cleared away,’

      They said, it would be grand!’



If seven maids with seven mops

      Swept it for half a year,

Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,

      That they could get it clear?’

I doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,

      And shed a bitter tear.



O Oysters, come and walk with us!’

      The Walrus did beseech.

A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,

      Along the briny beach:

We cannot do with more than four,

      To give a hand to each.’



The eldest Oyster looked at him,

      But never a word he said:

The eldest Oyster winked his eye,

      And shook his heavy head —

Meaning to say he did not choose

      To leave the oyster-bed.



But four young Oysters hurried up,

      All eager for the treat:

Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,

      Their shoes were clean and neat —

And this was odd, because, you know,

      They hadn’t any feet.



Four other Oysters followed them,

      And yet another four;

And thick and fast they came at last,

      And more, and more, and more —

All hopping through the frothy waves,

      And scrambling to the shore.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Walked on a mile or so,

And then they rested on a rock

      Conveniently low:

And all the little Oysters stood

      And waited in a row.



The time has come,’ the Walrus said,

      To talk of many things:

Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —

      Of cabbages — and kings —

And why the sea is boiling hot —

      And whether pigs have wings.’



But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,

      Before we have our chat;

For some of us are out of breath,

      And all of us are fat!’

No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.

      They thanked him much for that.



A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,

      Is what we chiefly need:

Pepper and vinegar besides

      Are very good indeed —

Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,

      We can begin to feed.’



But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,

      Turning a little blue.

After such kindness, that would be

      A dismal thing to do!’

The night is fine,’ the Walrus said.

      Do you admire the view?



It was so kind of you to come!

      And you are very nice!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      Cut us another slice:

I wish you were not quite so deaf —

      I’ve had to ask you twice!’



It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,

      To play them such a trick,

After we’ve brought them out so far,

      And made them trot so quick!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      The butter’s spread too thick!’



I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:

      I deeply sympathize.’

With sobs and tears he sorted out

      Those of the largest size,

Holding his pocket-handkerchief

      Before his streaming eyes.



O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,

      You’ve had a pleasant run!

Shall we be trotting home again?’

      But answer came there none —

And this was scarcely odd, because

      They’d eaten every one.”







More About this Poem
Related
VIDEO
Sarah and Evan Gregory read The Walrus and The Carpenter
FROM OURS POETICA
Sarah and Evan Gregory, of The Gregory Brothers, perform one of their favorite childhood poems by Lewis Carroll.
Read More
AUDIO
Play Episode
The Walrus and the Carpenter
FROM AUDIO POEM OF THE DAY October 2018
By Lewis Carroll
Read More
MORE POEMS BY LEWIS CARROLL
Jabberwocky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
A Boat Beneath a Sunny Sky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
The Hunting of the Snark
BY LEWIS CARROLL
See All Poems by this Author 








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The Walrus and the Carpenter 
Launch Audio in a New Window
BY LEWIS CARROLL
“The sun was shining on the sea,

      Shining with all his might:

He did his very best to make

      The billows smooth and bright —

And this was odd, because it was

      The middle of the night.



The moon was shining sulkily,

      Because she thought the sun

Had got no business to be there

      After the day was done —

“It’s very rude of him,” she said,

      “To come and spoil the fun.”



The sea was wet as wet could be,

      The sands were dry as dry.

You could not see a cloud, because

      No cloud was in the sky:

No birds were flying overhead —

      There were no birds to fly.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Were walking close at hand;

They wept like anything to see

      Such quantities of sand:

If this were only cleared away,’

      They said, it would be grand!’



If seven maids with seven mops

      Swept it for half a year,

Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,

      That they could get it clear?’

I doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,

      And shed a bitter tear.



O Oysters, come and walk with us!’

      The Walrus did beseech.

A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,

      Along the briny beach:

We cannot do with more than four,

      To give a hand to each.’



The eldest Oyster looked at him,

      But never a word he said:

The eldest Oyster winked his eye,

      And shook his heavy head —

Meaning to say he did not choose

      To leave the oyster-bed.



But four young Oysters hurried up,

      All eager for the treat:

Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,

      Their shoes were clean and neat —

And this was odd, because, you know,

      They hadn’t any feet.



Four other Oysters followed them,

      And yet another four;

And thick and fast they came at last,

      And more, and more, and more —

All hopping through the frothy waves,

      And scrambling to the shore.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Walked on a mile or so,

And then they rested on a rock

      Conveniently low:

And all the little Oysters stood

      And waited in a row.



The time has come,’ the Walrus said,

      To talk of many things:

Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —

      Of cabbages — and kings —

And why the sea is boiling hot —

      And whether pigs have wings.’



But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,

      Before we have our chat;

For some of us are out of breath,

      And all of us are fat!’

No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.

      They thanked him much for that.



A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,

      Is what we chiefly need:

Pepper and vinegar besides

      Are very good indeed —

Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,

      We can begin to feed.’



But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,

      Turning a little blue.

After such kindness, that would be

      A dismal thing to do!’

The night is fine,’ the Walrus said.

      Do you admire the view?



It was so kind of you to come!

      And you are very nice!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      Cut us another slice:

I wish you were not quite so deaf —

      I’ve had to ask you twice!’



It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,

      To play them such a trick,

After we’ve brought them out so far,

      And made them trot so quick!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      The butter’s spread too thick!’



I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:

      I deeply sympathize.’

With sobs and tears he sorted out

      Those of the largest size,

Holding his pocket-handkerchief

      Before his streaming eyes.



O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,

      You’ve had a pleasant run!

Shall we be trotting home again?’

      But answer came there none —

And this was scarcely odd, because

      They’d eaten every one.”







More About this Poem
Related
VIDEO
Sarah and Evan Gregory read The Walrus and The Carpenter
FROM OURS POETICA
Sarah and Evan Gregory, of The Gregory Brothers, perform one of their favorite childhood poems by Lewis Carroll.
Read More
AUDIO
Play Episode
The Walrus and the Carpenter
FROM AUDIO POEM OF THE DAY October 2018
By Lewis Carroll
Read More
MORE POEMS BY LEWIS CARROLL
Jabberwocky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
A Boat Beneath a Sunny Sky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
The Hunting of the Snark
BY LEWIS CARROLL
See All Poems by this Author 








Poetry Foundation Children

Poetry Magazine
CONTACT US
NEWSLETTERS
PRESS
PRIVACY POLICY
POLICIES
TERMS OF USE
POETRY MOBILE APP
61 West Superior Street,
Chicago, IL 60654
Hours:
Monday-Friday 11am – 4pm
© 2022 Poetry Foundation
See a problem on this page?




The Walrus and the Carpenter 
Launch Audio in a New Window
BY LEWIS CARROLL
“The sun was shining on the sea,

      Shining with all his might:

He did his very best to make

      The billows smooth and bright —

And this was odd, because it was

      The middle of the night.



The moon was shining sulkily,

      Because she thought the sun

Had got no business to be there

      After the day was done —

“It’s very rude of him,” she said,

      “To come and spoil the fun.”



The sea was wet as wet could be,

      The sands were dry as dry.

You could not see a cloud, because

      No cloud was in the sky:

No birds were flying overhead —

      There were no birds to fly.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Were walking close at hand;

They wept like anything to see

      Such quantities of sand:

If this were only cleared away,’

      They said, it would be grand!’



If seven maids with seven mops

      Swept it for half a year,

Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,

      That they could get it clear?’

I doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,

      And shed a bitter tear.



O Oysters, come and walk with us!’

      The Walrus did beseech.

A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,

      Along the briny beach:

We cannot do with more than four,

      To give a hand to each.’



The eldest Oyster looked at him,

      But never a word he said:

The eldest Oyster winked his eye,

      And shook his heavy head —

Meaning to say he did not choose

      To leave the oyster-bed.



But four young Oysters hurried up,

      All eager for the treat:

Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,

      Their shoes were clean and neat —

And this was odd, because, you know,

      They hadn’t any feet.



Four other Oysters followed them,

      And yet another four;

And thick and fast they came at last,

      And more, and more, and more —

All hopping through the frothy waves,

      And scrambling to the shore.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Walked on a mile or so,

And then they rested on a rock

      Conveniently low:

And all the little Oysters stood

      And waited in a row.



The time has come,’ the Walrus said,

      To talk of many things:

Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —

      Of cabbages — and kings —

And why the sea is boiling hot —

      And whether pigs have wings.’



But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,

      Before we have our chat;

For some of us are out of breath,

      And all of us are fat!’

No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.

      They thanked him much for that.



A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,

      Is what we chiefly need:

Pepper and vinegar besides

      Are very good indeed —

Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,

      We can begin to feed.’



But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,

      Turning a little blue.

After such kindness, that would be

      A dismal thing to do!’

The night is fine,’ the Walrus said.

      Do you admire the view?



It was so kind of you to come!

      And you are very nice!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      Cut us another slice:

I wish you were not quite so deaf —

      I’ve had to ask you twice!’



It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,

      To play them such a trick,

After we’ve brought them out so far,

      And made them trot so quick!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      The butter’s spread too thick!’



I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:

      I deeply sympathize.’

With sobs and tears he sorted out

      Those of the largest size,

Holding his pocket-handkerchief

      Before his streaming eyes.



O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,

      You’ve had a pleasant run!

Shall we be trotting home again?’

      But answer came there none —

And this was scarcely odd, because

      They’d eaten every one.”







More About this Poem
Related
VIDEO
Sarah and Evan Gregory read The Walrus and The Carpenter
FROM OURS POETICA
Sarah and Evan Gregory, of The Gregory Brothers, perform one of their favorite childhood poems by Lewis Carroll.
Read More
AUDIO
Play Episode
The Walrus and the Carpenter
FROM AUDIO POEM OF THE DAY October 2018
By Lewis Carroll
Read More
MORE POEMS BY LEWIS CARROLL
Jabberwocky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
A Boat Beneath a Sunny Sky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
The Hunting of the Snark
BY LEWIS CARROLL
See All Poems by this Author 








Poetry Foundation Children

Poetry Magazine
CONTACT US
NEWSLETTERS
PRESS
PRIVACY POLICY
POLICIES
TERMS OF USE
POETRY MOBILE APP
61 West Superior Street,
Chicago, IL 60654
Hours:
Monday-Friday 11am – 4pm
© 2022 Poetry Foundation
See a problem on this page?Skip to ContentShow Menu

POETRY FOUNDATION

POEMS & POETS




HARRIET


ARTICLES




VIDEO

PODCASTS

LEARN






EVENTS


POETRY MAGAZINE






ABOUT US








NewsletterSubscribe
Search



The Walrus and the Carpenter 
Launch Audio in a New Window
BY LEWIS CARROLL
“The sun was shining on the sea,

      Shining with all his might:

He did his very best to make

      The billows smooth and bright —

And this was odd, because it was

      The middle of the night.



The moon was shining sulkily,

      Because she thought the sun

Had got no business to be there

      After the day was done —

“It’s very rude of him,” she said,

      “To come and spoil the fun.”



The sea was wet as wet could be,

      The sands were dry as dry.

You could not see a cloud, because

      No cloud was in the sky:

No birds were flying overhead —

      There were no birds to fly.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Were walking close at hand;

They wept like anything to see

      Such quantities of sand:

If this were only cleared away,’

      They said, it would be grand!’



If seven maids with seven mops

      Swept it for half a year,

Do you suppose,’ the Walrus said,

      That they could get it clear?’

I doubt it,’ said the Carpenter,

      And shed a bitter tear.



O Oysters, come and walk with us!’

      The Walrus did beseech.

A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,

      Along the briny beach:

We cannot do with more than four,

      To give a hand to each.’



The eldest Oyster looked at him,

      But never a word he said:

The eldest Oyster winked his eye,

      And shook his heavy head —

Meaning to say he did not choose

      To leave the oyster-bed.



But four young Oysters hurried up,

      All eager for the treat:

Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,

      Their shoes were clean and neat —

And this was odd, because, you know,

      They hadn’t any feet.



Four other Oysters followed them,

      And yet another four;

And thick and fast they came at last,

      And more, and more, and more —

All hopping through the frothy waves,

      And scrambling to the shore.



The Walrus and the Carpenter

      Walked on a mile or so,

And then they rested on a rock

      Conveniently low:

And all the little Oysters stood

      And waited in a row.



The time has come,’ the Walrus said,

      To talk of many things:

Of shoes — and ships — and sealing-wax —

      Of cabbages — and kings —

And why the sea is boiling hot —

      And whether pigs have wings.’



But wait a bit,’ the Oysters cried,

      Before we have our chat;

For some of us are out of breath,

      And all of us are fat!’

No hurry!’ said the Carpenter.

      They thanked him much for that.



A loaf of bread,’ the Walrus said,

      Is what we chiefly need:

Pepper and vinegar besides

      Are very good indeed —

Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,

      We can begin to feed.’



But not on us!’ the Oysters cried,

      Turning a little blue.

After such kindness, that would be

      A dismal thing to do!’

The night is fine,’ the Walrus said.

      Do you admire the view?



It was so kind of you to come!

      And you are very nice!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      Cut us another slice:

I wish you were not quite so deaf —

      I’ve had to ask you twice!’



It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,

      To play them such a trick,

After we’ve brought them out so far,

      And made them trot so quick!’

The Carpenter said nothing but

      The butter’s spread too thick!’



I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:

      I deeply sympathize.’

With sobs and tears he sorted out

      Those of the largest size,

Holding his pocket-handkerchief

      Before his streaming eyes.



O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,

      You’ve had a pleasant run!

Shall we be trotting home again?’

      But answer came there none —

And this was scarcely odd, because

      They’d eaten every one.”







More About this Poem
Related
VIDEO
Sarah and Evan Gregory read The Walrus and The Carpenter
FROM OURS POETICA
Sarah and Evan Gregory, of The Gregory Brothers, perform one of their favorite childhood poems by Lewis Carroll.
Read More
AUDIO
Play Episode
The Walrus and the Carpenter
FROM AUDIO POEM OF THE DAY October 2018
By Lewis Carroll
Read More
MORE POEMS BY LEWIS CARROLL
Jabberwocky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
A Boat Beneath a Sunny Sky
BY LEWIS CARROLL
The Hunting of the Snark
BY LEWIS CARROLL
See All Poems by this Author 








Poetry Foundation Children

Poetry Magazine
CONTACT US
NEWSLETTERS
PRESS
PRIVACY POLICY
POLICIES
TERMS OF USE
POETRY MOBILE APP
61 West Superior Street,
Chicago, IL 60654
Hours:
Monday-Friday 11am – 4pm
© 2022 Poetry Foundation
See a problem on this page?

© 2022 Thomas E Williams

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